The Patrick J. Keane NC Archive

 

 

Patrick J. Keane is Professor Emeritus of Le Moyne College and a Contributing Editor at Numéro Cinq. Though he has written on a wide range of topics, his areas of special interest have been 19th and 20th-century poetry in the Romantic tradition; Irish literature and history; the interactions of literature with philosophic, religious, and political thinking; the impact of Nietzsche on certain 20th century writers; and, most recently, Transatlantic studies, exploring the influence of German Idealist philosophy and British Romanticism on American writers. His books include William Butler Yeats: Contemporary Studies in Literature (1973), A Wild Civility: Interactions in the Poetry and Thought of Robert Graves (1980), Yeats’s Interactions with Tradition (1987), Terrible Beauty: Yeats, Joyce, Ireland and the Myth of the Devouring Female (1988), Coleridge’s Submerged Politics (1994), Emerson, Romanticism, and Intuitive Reason: The Transatlantic “Light of All Our Day” (2003), and Emily Dickinson’s Approving God: Divine Design and the Problem of Suffering (2007).

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The Originality Paradox: Review of Samantha C. Harvey’s Transatlantic Transcendentalism: Coleridge, Emerson, and Nature

“Second Thoughts” in Seamus Heaney’s North: From “Antaeus” to “Hercules and Antaeus” to “Exposure”

Identity and Difference: Coleridge and Defoe, Crusoe and Friday, Prospero and Caliban

Keats and Identity: The Chameleon in the Crucible

On Looking Into and Beyond the Wordsworths’ Daffodils: An Intrinsic and Contextual Reading

The Wordsworthian Sources of Emersonian “Hope” and “Light”

Mark Twain, Nietzsche, and Terrible Truths that can Set Us Free

The Ambiguous Legacy of Nietzsche

Mountain Visions and Imaginative Usurpations

A Poetry of Petition: W. B. Yeats’s “The Stare’s Nest by my Window” and Derek Mahon’s “A Disused Shed in Co. Wexford”

The Senses of an Ending: The Grapes of Wrath, Novel and Film

Leaving the Zoo: A Fictional Memoir

  Chiaroscuro: A Memoir

  Eternal Recurrence: The Permanent Relevance of William Butler Yeats’s The Second Coming

  Rintrah, Essay upon a Cat

 Convergences: Memories Involving The Waste Land Manuscript

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