Apr 152011
 





A researcher analyzing the sounds in languages spoken around the world has detected an ancient signal that points to southern Africa as the place where modern human language originated.

The finding fits well with the evidence from fossil skulls and DNA that modern humans originated in Africa. It also implies, though does not prove, that modern language originated only once, an issue of considerable controversy among linguists.

The detection of such an ancient signal in language is surprising. Because words change so rapidly, many linguists think that languages cannot be traced very far back in time. The oldest language tree so far reconstructed, that of the Indo-European family, which includes English, goes back 9,000 years at most.

Quentin D. Atkinson, a biologist at the University of Auckland in New Zealand, has shattered this time barrier, if his claim is correct, by looking not at words but at phonemes — the consonants, vowels and tones that are the simplest elements of language. Dr. Atkinson, an expert at applying mathematical methods to linguistics, has found a simple but striking pattern in some 500 languages spoken throughout the world: A language area uses fewer phonemes the farther that early humans had to travel from Africa to reach it.

Some of the click-using languages of Africa have more than 100 phonemes, whereas Hawaiian, toward the far end of the human migration route out of Africa, has only 13. English has about 45 phonemes.

via Languages Grew From a Seed in Africa, a Study Says – NYTimes.com.


  One Response to “Languages Grew From a Seed in Africa, a Study Says – NYTimes.com”

  1. Breath-taking!!! (from a girl who remembers lying in bed at age 5 thinking that we ought to have more phenomes in English –though I didn’t yet know the word “phenome,” of course– trying out various guttural and clicking sounds, wondering if they could ever have meaning. I love that this was natural biology at work instead of just weird.)

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