MARCH ISSUE

Numéro Cinq at the Movies: Awe, Wonder & the Sublime in Filippo Baraccani’s “The Approximate Present” --- R. W. Gray
On the Shores of Darkness, There is Light | Cordelia Strube: Fiction & Interview — Ann Ireland
Atrocities Proliferate: Review of Newspaper by Edouard Levé --- Jason DeYoung
Undersung | R. F. Langley: Between Two Worlds --- Julie Larios
In the Garden: Fiction — Gary Garvin
Yearning for the Irretrievable | Pamela Petro: Art & Interview – JC Olsthoorn
Uimhir a Cúig |A Callows Childhood: Memoir --- Patrick Deeley
Ralph Maud's Prayer: Distilled | Poem --- Mary Maillard
How to Sightsee in France with your Teenage Son: Text & Photographs --- Natalia Sarkissian
Chance Encounters of a Literary Kind | Talk to Strangers and Stop on By: William Stafford --- Robert Day
Masterpieces Can’t Be Willed Into Existence: Review Portrait of a Man Known as Il Condottiere by Georges Perec --- Jeff Bursey
Bad News Waitress: Fiction --- Julie Reverb
A Choir of Pages: Review of Tom McCarthy's Satin Island — Frank Richardson
These are the Ferocious Challenges: An Interview With Diane Williams --- Jason Lucarelli
Top of the Page --- Patrick Keane
Numéro Cinq at the Movies: Awe, Wonder & the Sublime in Filippo Baraccani’s “The Approximate Present” --- R. W. Gray

Numéro Cinq at the Movies: Awe, Wonder & the Sublime in Filippo Baraccani’s “The Approximate Present” — R. W. Gray

Baraccani positions the short film’s spectator to swoon at the limits of the self, troubled between the self and beauteous landscapes, gripped by something akin to awe or wonder.

On the Shores of Darkness, There is Light | Cordelia Strube: Fiction & Interview — Ann Ireland

On the Shores of Darkness, There is Light | Cordelia Strube: Fiction & Interview — Ann Ireland

I am prolific because I don’t stop. Without a novel to swim around in, I sink, but I don’t write for hours a day, don’t push myself to produce a particular number of pages. I rewrite constantly, especially at the start of a novel when I’m trying to figure out the voice.

Atrocities Proliferate: Review of Newspaper by Edouard Levé --- Jason DeYoung

Atrocities Proliferate: Review of Newspaper by Edouard Levé — Jason DeYoung

No dateline attends the stories. Locations generally unspecified. It’s a newspaper, sans columns, a readymade novel, one event follows another. And like any daily newspaper, Newspaper can be riveting reading, and at other times dry (deliberately so)…

Undersung | R. F. Langley: Between Two Worlds --- Julie Larios

Undersung | R. F. Langley: Between Two Worlds — Julie Larios

By the end of my time spent with Langley’s work that afternoon in the library, I was smitten. Here was a poet whose poems combined so many of the qualities I search for: precise attention to details of the physical world, control of rhythm, love of language, large-heartedness, confidant risk-taking… a modern, original, identifiable voice.

In the Garden: Fiction — Gary Garvin

In the Garden: Fiction — Gary Garvin

…since we can’t love ourselves or each other but only what flees from us, what is beyond us, we turn love over to Someone, Something Else. But Something Else is only the burning residue of our selves extin­guished by the flame, selves collected and displaced, selves hidden from us by the act of conse­cration, selves blinded by the purity of our beseeching.

Yearning for the Irretrievable | Pamela Petro: Art & Interview – JC Olsthoorn

Yearning for the Irretrievable | Pamela Petro: Art & Interview – JC Olsthoorn

You know the feeling you get when you walk through very old cemeteries? A kind of frustration that you can’t ever know these people, even though testaments to their lives are right there before you. Truly, a “long field” separates you and your time from them and their time.

Uimhir a Cúig |A Callows Childhood: Memoir --- Patrick Deeley

Uimhir a Cúig |A Callows Childhood: Memoir — Patrick Deeley

Mostly I tried to coax the sadness to behave itself the way I might Jack, our jet-black pony, a kicker and a biter. Everyone must carry the disappointment that is part of them, I decided. But in the Callows the disappointing mope in my heart would shrink…

Ralph Maud's Prayer: Distilled | Poem --- Mary Maillard

Ralph Maud’s Prayer: Distilled | Poem — Mary Maillard

He also, as he was approaching death, considered that topic in a purely personal way, leaving behind an eight-page monograph entitled “Make My Way Plain.” In the found poem that follows, Mary Maillard has attempted to distill the essence of Ralph’s thoughts.

How to Sightsee in France with your Teenage Son: Text & Photographs --- Natalia Sarkissian

How to Sightsee in France with your Teenage Son: Text & Photographs — Natalia Sarkissian

Say, “Bienvenus en France, mes chers.” Then, since you’ve forgotten your son’s ID, panic when you see gendarmes at the booth scrutinizing arriving traffic. Look at the police straight on though, and smile when they wave you through.

Chance Encounters of a Literary Kind | Talk to Strangers and Stop on By: William Stafford --- Robert Day

Chance Encounters of a Literary Kind | Talk to Strangers and Stop on By: William Stafford — Robert Day

Have we come to believe that surveillance cameras in the high schools of tiny prairie towns will teach our students the eternal vigilance they’ll need to live in towns beyond their own? Or in their own?

Masterpieces Can’t Be Willed Into Existence: Review Portrait of a Man Known as Il Condottiere by Georges Perec --- Jeff Bursey

Masterpieces Can’t Be Willed Into Existence: Review Portrait of a Man Known as Il Condottiere by Georges Perec — Jeff Bursey

…that passage, with its shadows, the descent, and that dance, brings to mind the fondness the French have for murder mysteries and Edgar Allan Poe. (Jeff Bursey)

Bad News Waitress: Fiction --- Julie Reverb

Bad News Waitress: Fiction — Julie Reverb

“Oh god, oh god, ohhhhh I’m sorry I can’t help it.” He groaned again then inspected the condom, offering its contents to the last of the light. “Sorry that was a bit fast. The old chap had one too many whiskies.” “It’s fine,” she said, pulling her knickers out of her stockings, looking for the dog outside. “Did you?” “Yep.” “I can never tell….”

A Choir of Pages: Review of Tom McCarthy's Satin Island — Frank Richardson

A Choir of Pages: Review of Tom McCarthy’s Satin Island — Frank Richardson

Here we might make a connection with the mysterious, with some meaning lying beneath the surface of our lives. McCarthy leaves us, not with a confession, manifesto, treatise, or essay, but “a novel.” (Frank Richardson)

These are the Ferocious Challenges: An Interview With Diane Williams --- Jason Lucarelli

These are the Ferocious Challenges: An Interview With Diane Williams — Jason Lucarelli

A splendid plot cannot rescue a project spoiled by deficient language. And, of course, Sam is correct. A reader needs a compelling reason to move forward word to word—some would say even phoneme to phoneme—sentence to sentence. (Diane Williams)

Top of the Page --- Patrick Keane

Top of the Page — Patrick Keane

Top of the Page, that is, featured in the slider at the top of the home page, this month is Patrick J. Keane, a Contributing Editor at Numéro Cinq since 2011 (the February issue) when we published his essay “Convergences: Memories Involving The Waste Land Manuscript.” Pat quickly followed that up with an essay about his cat Rintrah…

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