NOVEMBER ISSUE

Numéro Cinq at the Movies | What I Make of Movies, and What They Make of Me: The Horror --- Julie Trimingham
Exempt from the Fang: Short Story --- Mark Anthony Jarman
Chance Encounters of a Literary Kind: Dave Smith --- Robert Day
Through a Glass Darkly: Mirror Scenes in Contemporary Scandinavian Detective Fiction --- Warren Motte
Hyperrealism in Words: Lisa Moore and the Ethics of Intensity --- Maria Jesús Hernáez Lerena
Undersung | Alastair Reid: A Sunstruck Madman  ---   Julie Larios
Traveling the Inner Reaches: Review of It Will End with Us  by Sam Savage --- Jeff Bursey
FPS: Fiction --- Bruce Stone
The Art of the Long Sentence --- Frank Richardson
The Duel: A Russian Story --- Myler Wilkinson
These Fictions, These Banalities: Review of Nicola, Milan by Lodovico Pignatti Morano --- Charlie Geoghegan-Clements
Radical Amazement: Art & Thought of Paul Sattler — Mary Kathryn Jablonski
Uimhir a Cúig | Route: Fiction --- Belinda McKeon
The Deathtube: Essay — Fernando Sdrigotti
Metanoia: Poem --- Sharon McCartney
Days of Hunger: Essay ---  Rigoberto González
First Solo: Memoir --- Richard Farrell
Vertigo, Video Death, Duels & Death Masks --- The Numéro Cinq November Issue Preview
Numéro Cinq at the Movies | What I Make of Movies, and What They Make of Me: The Horror --- Julie Trimingham

Numéro Cinq at the Movies | What I Make of Movies, and What They Make of Me: The Horror — Julie Trimingham

Aristotle would have us feel cleansed by tragedy, scrubbed by pity and fear. Screaming, crying, gasping at something that happens on screen allows our bodies to release some of the horror we feel simply because we’re human, because suffering exists, because the world is as cruel as it is beautiful. —Julie Trimingham

Exempt from the Fang: Short Story --- Mark Anthony Jarman

Exempt from the Fang: Short Story — Mark Anthony Jarman

I will try. We try on mysterious shoes, have mysterious offspring. One child wants to be a priest, one wants to be a pirate. Like the snake-handler, and like me, Adam and Eve felt exempt from the fang. Something changed. We sin and are forgiven, we fly to and fro, we are on earth, then we are in the heavens, then we are not, we are on earth, then we are back in the silent cup of stars, then we are not. —Mark Anthony Jarman

Chance Encounters of a Literary Kind: Dave Smith --- Robert Day

Chance Encounters of a Literary Kind: Dave Smith — Robert Day

In those literary magazines I read a number of poets whose work I knew (and knew in person as well as in print) and some I did not: Dave Smith was among the latter in both regards. But instead of being just a poet whose poetry I had not read, he became a poet who sent his poems directly (and especially) to me via a literary cosmic connection established well before the Internet.

Through a Glass Darkly: Mirror Scenes in Contemporary Scandinavian Detective Fiction --- Warren Motte

Through a Glass Darkly: Mirror Scenes in Contemporary Scandinavian Detective Fiction — Warren Motte

…that danger is defined precisely by the possibility that the subject might fail to recognize herself. It is a fear that haunts many of us, notably including those people who inhabit the worlds of Scandinavian detective novels: “What she feared most of all was to…step into the elevator at work and discover that the mirror reflected someone else.” —Warren Motte

Hyperrealism in Words: Lisa Moore and the Ethics of Intensity --- Maria Jesús Hernáez Lerena

Hyperrealism in Words: Lisa Moore and the Ethics of Intensity — Maria Jesús Hernáez Lerena

Alligator teaches us to embark on an absolute concentration on what the eye receives. Like hyperrealist painting, it alters our sensory perceptions of objects around us; we start noticing them and pausing on them once we are out of the novel. She [Moore] concentrates on the defocalizing power of a random element that does not fit within the machinery of life. —María Jesús Hernáez Lerena

Undersung | Alastair Reid: A Sunstruck Madman  ---   Julie Larios

Undersung | Alastair Reid: A Sunstruck Madman — Julie Larios

Reid’s origins might have been provincial — even restrictive — but as he grew his poetry and poetry became more and more cosmopolitan and expansive. He regarded translation as an act resembling “bewitchment;” and he wrote that the translation of someone else’s work required “not only reading it deeply and deciphering it, but climbing on top of the scenery backstage, up onto the supports and the scaffolding.”

Traveling the Inner Reaches: Review of It Will End with Us  by Sam Savage --- Jeff Bursey

Traveling the Inner Reaches: Review of It Will End with Us by Sam Savage — Jeff Bursey

A common feature of the five prose novels is that Savage assumes, without being presumptuous, that what he wants to get across about interior states can be told, despite the obstacle of language and in however provisional a fashion. Clearly his narrators don’t share that hard-won assurance, and we witness how their opinions often are not so much nuanced as worried down to a nub.

FPS: Fiction --- Bruce Stone

FPS: Fiction — Bruce Stone

This is gonna hurt a little. The shooter mouths these words in a hush, the syllables squashed and slurred, just coded exhalations of cotton mouth and brimstone, aimless as smoke rings, not quite turned to purpose vis-à-vis the face of the woman behind the plate glass. With one hand beyond the shooter’s line of sight, she’s got a death grip, he knows, on the handle of the guard door, all of the blue veins bulging wildly, desperate to halt his ingress.

The Art of the Long Sentence --- Frank Richardson

The Art of the Long Sentence — Frank Richardson

It wasn’t until I discovered Marcel Proust’s À la recherche du temps perdu that I learned to appreciate how long and short sentences can be juxtaposed for emphasis and how syntax can mimic the flow of thought and action. The closest analogy I can imagine is that discovering Proust’s long sentences was like discovering a new genre of music, as if I had lived my life without knowing there existed such things as symphonies.

The Duel: A Russian Story --- Myler Wilkinson

The Duel: A Russian Story — Myler Wilkinson

And then, from across the room, comes the one whom I have been waiting for; the one whom I know I shall have one day to kill; he arrives with the curling mustaches of an adolescent, blondly gleaming in the hall of mirrors, the one who dances so well; the one who will not leave my wife alone. I stand alone in the shadows of the colonnades, watching them make love to one another, and in my impotence, my legs grow weak…

These Fictions, These Banalities: Review of Nicola, Milan by Lodovico Pignatti Morano --- Charlie Geoghegan-Clements

These Fictions, These Banalities: Review of Nicola, Milan by Lodovico Pignatti Morano — Charlie Geoghegan-Clements

…a carefully constructed series of symbols, never representing anything more profound than the artist who made them, the store they were bought from…a Milan that “exists only as much as the name of a city stamped on a luxury brand shopping bag,” where self-actualization isn’t an expression of a fundamental self…

Radical Amazement: Art & Thought of Paul Sattler — Mary Kathryn Jablonski

Radical Amazement: Art & Thought of Paul Sattler — Mary Kathryn Jablonski

Often, but not always, there is a central tree, a hole or passage going underground, and a view to a lit blue sky. There is an overall intelligence, an art historical reference you cannot always put your finger on. The artist appears in many of his own works, as does the figure of his wife. But having spelled out this “recipe” for the paintings, there is also nothing about them to be expected.

Uimhir a Cúig | Route: Fiction --- Belinda McKeon

Uimhir a Cúig | Route: Fiction — Belinda McKeon

The ten-dollar gin thing in front of Annie is called a Sleepy Hello, and she could tell from the first sip that she would need three if she was to get anywhere close to drunk. Which means that she is probably safe, as far as confessions go – though since confession is the word which has most readily come to mind, possibly not.

The Deathtube: Essay — Fernando Sdrigotti

The Deathtube: Essay — Fernando Sdrigotti

Death documented, filmed, scripted. There’s an aesthetics of digital death born out of repetition: different angles, the recurrence of certain facial expressions, animal howls, pixelation, camera jumps. Different genres: people filming other people being killed for the camera, people killing other people, people filming already dead people, people filming their own deaths. A register of every wound, every shot, every severed head or limb…

Metanoia: Poem --- Sharon McCartney

Metanoia: Poem — Sharon McCartney

Every morning, the first thing that I did at work was open an online version of Four Quartets on a tab on my computer and an email message to myself. Throughout the day, I surreptitiously read bits of Four Quartets whenever the dreardom overwhelmed. As lines and images materialized, I jotted them down in the email and, at the end of the day, dispatched the message to myself at home. Those lines and images became Metanoia.

Days of Hunger: Essay ---  Rigoberto González

Days of Hunger: Essay — Rigoberto González

I looked down at my plate. I had scarcely touched it. My fork was still buried in the entrails of the dog food lasagna. The moment of reckoning was in my hands. I was no longer the boy who belonged to the Alcalá women, I was now a young man who had joined the hardscrabble lives of the González family. —Rigoberto González

First Solo: Memoir --- Richard Farrell

First Solo: Memoir — Richard Farrell

I didn’t realize that deep fear often accompanies life’s most extraordinary moments. I had no way of realizing that the minutes that terrify and most rattle us are the ones that will stand out. Like a bas relief of memory, those moments become enshrined by their height and importance: the first girl I would eventually kiss, the first time I would fall in love, the birth of my children…

Vertigo, Video Death, Duels & Death Masks --- The Numéro Cinq November Issue Preview

Vertigo, Video Death, Duels & Death Masks — The Numéro Cinq November Issue Preview

I really never know how an NC issue is going to come to shape in the end, what obsessions lurk in the editors or the minds of the contributors. This one circles the macabre, with death and violence at its core, but, yes, still ardent, beautiful, uncanny.

RECENT BACK ISSUES