MAY ISSUE

Numéro Cinq at the Movies: Lucrecia Martel's "La ciudad que huye" --- Introduced by Sophie M. Lavoie
Undersung | John Malcolm Brinnin: "As Well-Known as I Deserve to Be" --- Julie Larios
It Is Not a Novelist’s Job to be Merciful: An Interview with Sam Savage---Jeff Bursey
Isaak: from Genealogy of the First Person | Poem --- D. M. Spitzer
Uimhir a Cúig | Sons Are Older At The Speed Of Light: Poems --- Macdara Woods
Childhood: Five Wonders --- Leona Theis
Chance Encounters of the Literary Kind: Screenwriter Walter Bernstein --- Robert Day
Anti-film: Interview with Video Artist Gunilla Josephson ---  Ann Ireland
The Koans of Atticus Lish: Review of Preparation for the Next Life — Tom Faure
White Wolf, a work in progress: Fiction --- Madison Smartt Bell
The Administered World of Theodor Adorno: Essay --- Jeremy Brunger
Sing! O Bone: Essay — Julie Trimingham
Bad Sex: Fiction --- Jowita Bydlowska
Theory and Ardour: A Review of Alice Fulton's Barely Composed --- Patrick O'Reilly
My Struggle: Book Four | Novel Excerpt --- Karl Ove Knausgaard
A Kind of Freak, a Monster: A Review of Karl Ove Knausgaard's My Struggle: Book Four --- Jeff Bursey
Inquiring Spirit: My Friend, Jim Cerasoli (1938-2015) — Patrick J. Keane
Top of the Page in May | Essays & Translation --- Genese  Grill
Numéro Cinq at the Movies: Lucrecia Martel's "La ciudad que huye" --- Introduced by Sophie M. Lavoie

Numéro Cinq at the Movies: Lucrecia Martel’s “La ciudad que huye” — Introduced by Sophie M. Lavoie

They fear the violence which they perceive comes from the lower levels of Argentinian society, from the so-called villas or villas miserias, the Argentine equivalent of Brazilian favelas or shantytowns…

Undersung | John Malcolm Brinnin: "As Well-Known as I Deserve to Be" --- Julie Larios

Undersung | John Malcolm Brinnin: “As Well-Known as I Deserve to Be” — Julie Larios

For me, Brinnin the Gossip comes across at times witty, at other times narcissistic; Brinnin’s poetry, on the other hand, is humble and full of wonder. Without wonder (and its co-conspirator, curiosity) poetry cannot exist…

It Is Not a Novelist’s Job to be Merciful: An Interview with Sam Savage---Jeff Bursey

It Is Not a Novelist’s Job to be Merciful: An Interview with Sam Savage—Jeff Bursey

When it started selling in the hundreds of thousands in Europe I was flabbergasted. Flabbergasted by the numbers, of course, but also by the fact that people seemed to be reading a book I didn’t know I had written.

Isaak: from Genealogy of the First Person | Poem --- D. M. Spitzer

Isaak: from Genealogy of the First Person | Poem — D. M. Spitzer

I watch light fracture, shape itself along the bronze edge. it radiates out of the hip of my father; it rises. the sea is vastly overhead. pine and cedar spindles tinge and reverberate the knife’s call.

Uimhir a Cúig | Sons Are Older At The Speed Of Light: Poems --- Macdara Woods

Uimhir a Cúig | Sons Are Older At The Speed Of Light: Poems — Macdara Woods

My father did not finish things / Such things as rows / Or playing parts And breakdowns / Retiring early Died too soon / His final words to me — A / Half a question Half unasked / At no point answered…

Childhood: Five Wonders --- Leona Theis

Childhood: Five Wonders — Leona Theis

A finger in the flame, how long can you hold it there? Or drip some wax into the palm of your hand and feel the bite. The small rituals of our club of two in our safe little hideaway, built too small for grown-ups. We were the bosses down there. We owned the place.

Chance Encounters of the Literary Kind: Screenwriter Walter Bernstein --- Robert Day

Chance Encounters of the Literary Kind: Screenwriter Walter Bernstein — Robert Day

But, yes, there was confusion about horses, sometimes they were horses, then they were stallions, then they were mares (when in fact they were probably all geldings). I had to untangle bridles from halters; I had to take horns off cows…

Anti-film: Interview with Video Artist Gunilla Josephson ---  Ann Ireland

Anti-film: Interview with Video Artist Gunilla Josephson — Ann Ireland

Rebellion as a theme throughout any feminist discourse is an intrinsic part of my work. From the actions of the characters (or performers) to my own use of the video camera and later in the editing process I disrupt the norms, constructing resistances to the tyranny of orthodoxy.

The Koans of Atticus Lish: Review of Preparation for the Next Life — Tom Faure

The Koans of Atticus Lish: Review of Preparation for the Next Life — Tom Faure

The most devastating aspect of Preparation for the Next Life is not its rich, understated description of wealthy nations and poor people in the Age of Terror. It’s the love story.

White Wolf, a work in progress: Fiction --- Madison Smartt Bell

White Wolf, a work in progress: Fiction — Madison Smartt Bell

There was nothing to fear coming out the arched shadows between the darkening apple trees; rather fear emerged from shadowy niches inside my head only; as much as I knew it to be true my unease grew as the darkness expanded…

The Administered World of Theodor Adorno: Essay --- Jeremy Brunger

The Administered World of Theodor Adorno: Essay — Jeremy Brunger

The nightmare of Adorno’s century has through our silent consent found a home in our own 21st, replete as it is with ever-increasing economic disparity, ever-decreasing historical literacy, fundamentalist religion become ascendant,…

Sing! O Bone: Essay — Julie Trimingham

Sing! O Bone: Essay — Julie Trimingham

An old man steals the Queen of the Night’s daughter. The queen finds her girl, and gives her a knife. The Queen, in her famously high aria, commands her daughter to stab the old lech to death. The name of this fancy, super-femme song is Hell’s Vengeance Boils in My Heart.

Bad Sex: Fiction --- Jowita Bydlowska

Bad Sex: Fiction — Jowita Bydlowska

On the last day I would ever see him, right after we fucked inside the Starbucks stall, we were crossing the street together, me ahead of him. A fast car came from out of nowhere, from around the corner and I lunged to escape getting hit.

Theory and Ardour: A Review of Alice Fulton's Barely Composed --- Patrick O'Reilly

Theory and Ardour: A Review of Alice Fulton’s Barely Composed — Patrick O’Reilly

The subject matter itself is often grim. And in their way, these lines can take on a bleak dimension of their own, a nihilistic push off the cliff of linguistic certainty. But silence, once it has been confronted, must be pushed out.

My Struggle: Book Four | Novel Excerpt --- Karl Ove Knausgaard

My Struggle: Book Four | Novel Excerpt — Karl Ove Knausgaard

Oh, this is the song about the young man who loves a young woman. Has he the right to use such a word as “love”? He knows nothing about life, he knows nothing about her, he knows nothing about himself.

A Kind of Freak, a Monster: A Review of Karl Ove Knausgaard's My Struggle: Book Four --- Jeff Bursey

A Kind of Freak, a Monster: A Review of Karl Ove Knausgaard’s My Struggle: Book Four — Jeff Bursey

Knausgaard peels back his more youthful self’s skin to reveal confusion, desire, and ineptitude without once asking for pity.

Inquiring Spirit: My Friend, Jim Cerasoli (1938-2015) — Patrick J. Keane

Inquiring Spirit: My Friend, Jim Cerasoli (1938-2015) — Patrick J. Keane

Alex showed me something his father had inscribed on the library wall: “My improbable God: before Infinity, there is God; after Infinity, there is God.” If that’s not good enough to get into the “religious” cemetery, to hell with them.

Top of the Page in May | Essays & Translation --- Genese  Grill

Top of the Page in May | Essays & Translation — Genese Grill

Top of the Page for the month of May: Genese Grill, our resident Musil, Proust, and Modernism expert, currently riding a wave of publishing success with her translation of Robert Musil essays Thought Flights (Contra Mundum Press) to be launched May 10 in New York.

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