AUGUST ISSUE

Numéro Cinq at the Movies: Roy Andersson's "World of Glory" -- R. W. Gray
Small-City Chatter: Review of Jeff Bursey’s Mirrors on which dust has fallen --- Mark Sampson
Public Opinions—Private Laziness: The Epistemological Break in Nietzsche --- Jeremy Brunger
One Drunken Preschool Summer: Childhood — Meg Harris
Interviewing God: Poems & Paintings --- Kate Fetherston
Every Book is Like Writing a Book for the First Time: Interview with Greg Mulcahy --- Jason Lucarelli
Infiltrate: Fiction --- Timothy Dugdale
Restlessness: Poems --- Louise Bak
Trolling for the Fisher King: Starting in Gloucester — Paul Pines
Case Notes: Fiction — Brianna Berbenuik
The Drama of the Mind: A Profile of Janice Galloway --- Victoria Best
Abacus: Novel Excerpt --- Louis Armand
There, Gaping: Review of Liz Howard’s Infinite Citizen of the Shaking Tent — Natalie Helberg
Raccoon and Other Poems — Amber Homeniuk
The Mermaid: A Conversation with Fides Krucker --- Julie Trimingham
Numéro Cinq at the Movies: Roy Andersson's "World of Glory" -- R. W. Gray

Numéro Cinq at the Movies: Roy Andersson’s “World of Glory” — R. W. Gray

Andersson connects one man’s mortal fears, the lurid, almost pathetic small things he holds on to as normalcy against life’s passing, and the awful crime that haunts the film.

Small-City Chatter: Review of Jeff Bursey’s Mirrors on which dust has fallen --- Mark Sampson

Small-City Chatter: Review of Jeff Bursey’s Mirrors on which dust has fallen — Mark Sampson

…an explosively unconventional, deeply disturbing, and relentlessly original work. This is not, in effect, your daddy’s Canadian Literature.

Public Opinions—Private Laziness: The Epistemological Break in Nietzsche --- Jeremy Brunger

Public Opinions—Private Laziness: The Epistemological Break in Nietzsche — Jeremy Brunger

Nietzsche’s view of slave morality was idiosyncratic: he thought the rich were slaves, the skilled workers were slaves, and homeowners were slaves par excellence.

One Drunken Preschool Summer: Childhood — Meg Harris

One Drunken Preschool Summer: Childhood — Meg Harris

Years later you are told by the ladies that so many children were born in 1957 because the summer before your mother taught everyone the rhythm method of birth control. The result of these instructions were you and at least six other children.

Interviewing God: Poems & Paintings --- Kate Fetherston

Interviewing God: Poems & Paintings — Kate Fetherston

Weary of mere hallelujah, I held the moon’s dark / backside and lounged on my netherworld throne. People / yammered and I tried to listen. For awhile, to get my / attention, small burnt animals smoldered on every / hillock…

Every Book is Like Writing a Book for the First Time: Interview with Greg Mulcahy --- Jason Lucarelli

Every Book is Like Writing a Book for the First Time: Interview with Greg Mulcahy — Jason Lucarelli

Sam Lipsyte says, “Reading Greg Mulcahy’s sentences is like watching the best slalom skiers in the world dare the universe a crazy millimeter at a time,”

Infiltrate: Fiction --- Timothy Dugdale

Infiltrate: Fiction — Timothy Dugdale

The black man exploded. “I will not sit down. I have been sitting down. I’m finished sitting down. This country must not sit down!” He pointed at the father. “You will not infiltrate.” And then he pointed at the women on the chairs. “And you, you will not breed.”

Restlessness: Poems --- Louise Bak

Restlessness: Poems — Louise Bak

…inaba, in Japanese mythology, there’s a tale of coming upon a rabbit stripped of its skin and / crying. It was told it’d recover, by washing off in seawater, but doing so, things got worse / wbv, refers to weight-based victimization…

Trolling for the Fisher King: Starting in Gloucester — Paul Pines

Trolling for the Fisher King: Starting in Gloucester — Paul Pines

Poet Paul Pines brilliantly explores of the legend of the Fisher King, the wounded god, the limping savior, myths of transformation and healing, and Charles Olson’s great poem “The Kingfishers”.

Case Notes: Fiction — Brianna Berbenuik

Case Notes: Fiction — Brianna Berbenuik

It’s a strange level of intimacy, a weird brand of seven minutes in heaven, locked in a murder file room with a photo album, like someone showing you their family portraits, their childhood.

The Drama of the Mind: A Profile of Janice Galloway --- Victoria Best

The Drama of the Mind: A Profile of Janice Galloway — Victoria Best

Characters in Galloway’s books are often alive to their inner jellyfish, and aware of – even enduring – the myriad situations in which the hammer may fall.

Abacus: Novel Excerpt --- Louis Armand

Abacus: Novel Excerpt — Louis Armand

Like his earlier novels, Abacus sinks its teeth deep within an environment—this time Armand’s homeland—providing the reader with a visceral understanding of the territory, and thus a greater empathy for the individuals who roam each page.

There, Gaping: Review of Liz Howard’s Infinite Citizen of the Shaking Tent — Natalie Helberg

There, Gaping: Review of Liz Howard’s Infinite Citizen of the Shaking Tent — Natalie Helberg

…an extended metaphor for the mind…a fiery, radiant rollick through language…a meditation on Indigenous lineage and muted origins….eerily coalescing at the junction of race, class, and gender

Raccoon and Other Poems — Amber Homeniuk

Raccoon and Other Poems — Amber Homeniuk

you think it won’t end—the pain or the singing—then it does / borne late into the season / my belly tympanic in the empty / our whole selves arched, hairy with need and / fast unhooking days from the year…

The Mermaid: A Conversation with Fides Krucker --- Julie Trimingham

The Mermaid: A Conversation with Fides Krucker — Julie Trimingham

…your first singing teacher, an Italian soprano who would clasp her left breast, squeeze it, and demand, at the end of your run, Another one for baby Jesus! I love this image. Can you please elaborate?

RECENT BACK ISSUES

Vol. VI, No. 6, June 2015