DECEMBER ISSUE

Numéro Cinq at the Movies | What I Make of Movies, and What They Make of Me: Raising Hell — Julie Trimingham
In the Palm Garden: Review of W. S Merwin's The Moon before Morning --- A. Anupama
Willingly: Photographs --- Jowita Bydlowska
Lovingly Damaged Language: A Review of Lisa Robertson’s Cinema of the Present --- Natalie Helberg
Uimhir a Cúig | Déjà Vu: Fiction --- Mary Morrissy
Grave & Vital Nonsense: Poems --- Lise Gaston
Natural Supernaturalism: Emily Dickinson’s Variations on the Romantic Theme of an Earthly Paradise — Patrick J. Keane
Emotion of Multitudes: Subplots in Novels --- Shambhavi Roy
The Impossible Economy of Rilke’s Roses: An Interview with Translator David Need --- Dan Holmes
From Roses by Rainer Maria Rilke --- Translated by David Need
A Rapid Fire Life: Review of Nell Zink's The Wallcreeper — Benjamin Woodard
Assembly + Departure: Text Art --- Chaulky White
Hot: Short Story --- Adrienne Love
Top of the Page --- Bruce Stone
Your Ticket to Apocalypse --- Numéro Cinq's December Issue Preview
Numéro Cinq at the Movies | What I Make of Movies, and What They Make of Me: Raising Hell — Julie Trimingham

Numéro Cinq at the Movies | What I Make of Movies, and What They Make of Me: Raising Hell — Julie Trimingham

The subject was voice, how you can lose it, how you can get it back. The subject was a woman’s relationship to a man, how she loses herself, how she gets her self back. How it can be hard to tell a suicide jump from a leap of faith, spiritually (or artistically) speaking. Both require the abyss. How to tell falling from flight?

In the Palm Garden: Review of W. S Merwin's The Moon before Morning --- A. Anupama

In the Palm Garden: Review of W. S Merwin’s The Moon before Morning — A. Anupama

The waning moon and a streetlight offered to help when I lost the silver pendant of my necklace walking my puppy in the early morning twilight. But after a moment’s search I let it hide, something precious and intimate concealed, and now it endears that part of the neighborhood to me, as Merwin does with every poem.

Willingly: Photographs --- Jowita Bydlowska

Willingly: Photographs — Jowita Bydlowska

Last year Jowita Bydlowska published a stern and unforgiving memoir called Drunk Mom, about life as an alcoholic mother of a months-old child. She also takes photographs. The ones I like project a dark femininity, a gender-bending, violent, transgressive girlhood/womanhood. They are erotic, fretted with death, both fearful and fearless, compulsive, defiant, disturbing, and secret.

Lovingly Damaged Language: A Review of Lisa Robertson’s Cinema of the Present --- Natalie Helberg

Lovingly Damaged Language: A Review of Lisa Robertson’s Cinema of the Present — Natalie Helberg

Is it any good is the wrong question; how is it changing the terms of our enjoyment is the right one. Cinema of the Present is a threshold experience I pin brilliant. It bites the fruit it invents and brains us, tingling. It is behind-the-scenes, pink wrench-work: It is an action on us. Now.

Uimhir a Cúig | Déjà Vu: Fiction --- Mary Morrissy

Uimhir a Cúig | Déjà Vu: Fiction — Mary Morrissy

The hospital is a stone’s throw from Suesey Street, the part of town I used to frequent a decade ago, when we were an item. Last week, after my session, I found myself wandering there when I had one of my turns. It was a thundery kind of day; the sun was spiteful. There I was, passing “our” pub. Where we would meet on days like this one, hot and humid, or on brown afternoons threatening rain, during our two seasons together.

Grave & Vital Nonsense: Poems --- Lise Gaston

Grave & Vital Nonsense: Poems — Lise Gaston

…red ears pressed to the humming / red intestine of the building where the plaster’s peeled off, / we push our chests against the doorways, / press our sweet soft fingers into / the red intestine of the building, the plaster peeled off, // but I wanted to tell you still how lovely we are. // Our hard, skilled fingers nothing but / caulk between the stones— / but I wanted to tell you still how lovely we are, / in our grave and vital nonsense.

Natural Supernaturalism: Emily Dickinson’s Variations on the Romantic Theme of an Earthly Paradise — Patrick J. Keane

Natural Supernaturalism: Emily Dickinson’s Variations on the Romantic Theme of an Earthly Paradise — Patrick J. Keane

Dickinson’s Romantic vision of an Earthly Paradise, its minute particulars as cherished as its sublime manifestations and all the more beautiful because it is under the shadow of death, is reminiscent of Wordsworth, before he froze over, and of Dickinson’s beloved Keats, who never froze over.

Emotion of Multitudes: Subplots in Novels --- Shambhavi Roy

Emotion of Multitudes: Subplots in Novels — Shambhavi Roy

Rose occupies far less space than Marianne because Jane Austen wants to initiate a dialogue with her readers, but Anne Tyler seems to open our minds to a new idea, one that may not have too many takers in the middle class. The key thing to note is the fact that subplots must parallel or reflect the main plot, otherwise the various elements of a novel fly apart and the text lacks rhythm and unity of thought.

The Impossible Economy of Rilke’s Roses: An Interview with Translator David Need --- Dan Holmes

The Impossible Economy of Rilke’s Roses: An Interview with Translator David Need — Dan Holmes

When I did the translations I felt, “I’m being allowed into the room where I’m getting to sit down with this poet and his intelligence is still present in the poems, even though he’s dead. This isn’t just somebody who’s teaching me how to think, but is somehow making a place for me.” So you can make art that isn’t just an artifact…

From Roses by Rainer Maria Rilke --- Translated by David Need

From Roses by Rainer Maria Rilke — Translated by David Need

The rose’s vitality belies its eventual death; its blooming won’t diminish the impenetrable density of its petals. Clare Johnson’s attending illustrations reinforce Rilke’s assertion that the rose of these poems is “a supple spoken word / framed by the text of things” and that this “framing” constitutes a relationship binding our transitory hopes to “the tender moments / in the continual departure.”

A Rapid Fire Life: Review of Nell Zink's The Wallcreeper — Benjamin Woodard

A Rapid Fire Life: Review of Nell Zink’s The Wallcreeper — Benjamin Woodard

A novel that’s difficult to summarize, for while one could say the book is a lampoon of modern relationships, or an elongated joke about eco-terrorism, or a satire concerning birdwatchers and American expats stumbling through life in Europe, each of these interpretations fails to capture the pure insanity that rockets through the narrative’s gnarled veins.

Assembly + Departure: Text Art --- Chaulky White

Assembly + Departure: Text Art — Chaulky White

An excerpt from ‘SSES” ‘SSES” “SSEY’—a book based on an MFA thesis Derek White’s brother Kevin wrote in 1990 wherein he recapitulates Joyce’s Ulysses’ recapitulation of Homer’s Odyssey in a trip he took across Asia in search of their father (who committed suicide years before). The book takes Kevin’s text one step further, folding in journals, stories, and artwork he made before dying of a drug overdose.

Hot: Short Story --- Adrienne Love

Hot: Short Story — Adrienne Love

I am beyond hot for Jeremiah, who’s only 20, half my age, and in a relationship. But the relationship isn’t the problem because Jeremiah’s not in love with his girl—he’s in love with me. And it’s not our ages either, though I could be his mother. The problem is that while I would love to shag Jeremiah silly—God knows I would—I’m in love with my husband, Thomas. Really. It’s these darned herbs I’m taking to get us pregnant.

Top of the Page --- Bruce Stone

Top of the Page — Bruce Stone

In the slider at the Top of the Page this month — Bruce Stone, who first contributed a short story to NC in the June, 2010, issue. He has published reviews and essays intermittently since then, always closely argued, erudite, controversial. Last month (November) we published his horrific short story “FPS,” the account of a school shooting, much like Sandy Hook, from the point of view of the teenage mass murderer.

Your Ticket to Apocalypse --- Numéro Cinq's December Issue Preview

Your Ticket to Apocalypse — Numéro Cinq’s December Issue Preview

It’s the turning-of-the-year, the hinge of the world creaking, the door shutting behind us, much new horror anticipated for the New Year (but before that, Christmas shopping). And so we call this the Apocalypse issue, the raising of the veil issue, the revelation of a previously unfathomable future complete with dancing girls and hoola-hoops.

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